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Local News

  • HALL COUNTY, Ga. - Authorities in Hall County are investigating after a student claimed there was a gun on a school bus. An official with Hall County Schools told Channel 2 Action News that a student on the bus 'thought it would be funny to yell out a threat about having a gun.' The bus driver alerted authorities and was instructed to pull over in the area of Dawsonville Highway and McEver Road. The Gainesville Police Department searched the bus and found no weapons. The student who made the threat was taken into custody and charged with disorderly conduct. The bus involved was transporting students from Chestatee Middle School and Chestatee High School.
  • From the Oglethorpe County Sheriff’s Office... The Sheriff’s Office is looking for Bobby Gene Gunter. He is a registered sex offender and has warrants for probation violation out of Clarke County for statutory rape. Which is having sex with an underage girl less than 16 years old.  Mr. Gunter has ran from deputies twice in the last two days. He likes to run early and often. If you see Mr. Gunter please call 911 and report it to your local law enforcement. He was last seen on Watkins Farm Rd and at 1751 Crawford Smithonia Rd. We appreciate your help in finding this fugitive.
  • The Georgia Bulldogs’ run to the College Football Playoff National Championship Game wouldn’t have been possible without the work of Kirby Smart’s staff. And now they’re going to be compensated because of it. Smart’s 10 on-field assistants will earn nearly $2 million more in 2018 than they did in 2017. In 2017, Smart’s assistants made $4.56 million. In 2018, they’ll make $6.42 million. Defensive Coordinator Mel Tucker has received a raise to $1.5 million, up from $900,000 last year. Georgia’s defense was one of the best in the country this past season. Assistant coach James Coley, who is expected to move from receivers coach to another position, has been bumped to $850,000 from $450,000 last year. Coley turned down a job offer from Texas A&M to become offensive coordinator. Offensive line coach Sam Pittman will now earn $825,000, after earning $660,000 last year.  Offensive coordinator Jim Chaney received a $100,000 raise and will now earn $950,000. Strength and conditioning coordinator Scott Sinclair also received a significant bump and will now earn $450,000. Sinclair earned $300,000 last year.  2018 staff: Mel Tucker - $1,500,000 Jim Chaney - $950,000 James Coley - $850,000 Sam Pittman - $825,000 Dell McGee - $550,000 Tray Scott - $420,000 Cortez Hankton - $375,000 Glenn Schumann - $325,000 Dan Lanning - $325,000 Scott Fountain - $300,000  2017 staff:  Mel Tucker - $900,000 Jim Chaney - $850,000 Sam Pittman - $660,000 James Coley - $450,000 Tray Scott - $400,000 Kevin Sherrer - $375,000 Dell McGee - $350,000 Shane Beamer - $300,000 Glenn Schumann - $275,000 Smart himself is expected to receive a substantial increase from his $3.75 million base salary, but that has not been announced yet.  New roles and titles on the staff could also be in order, but were not announced.  Georgia’s salary rule compares favorably with that of the staffs of two other powerhouse programs, who have also announced their assistant coach salaries for 2018.  Ohio State’s assistant coaches now make $7.06 million, with raises this offseason that totaled $3.4 million. So it nearly doubled, helped by the addition of the 10th assistant coach, Alex Grinch, who received $800,000 to leave Washington State for Ohio State.  Eight of Ohio State’s 10 assistants are earning at least $500,000.  The salary pool for Clemson’s assistant coaches is now $6.58 million, with raises this offseason of just under $1 million. Four of Clemson’s assistant coaches are earning at least $500,000. This article was written by Seth Emerson, DawgNation.
  • A Gwinnett County father said his daughter has been scared for months after she was mistakenly pulled out of school by the Division of Family and Children Services. Sean Harris said his daughter, who was 7-years-old at the time, never made it to her after-school program, and for hours he had no idea where she was. DFCS had taken the girl out of class at Rosebud Elementary School and driven her to the Rockdale County DFCS office. But they had the wrong child. The two girls at the school had the same first and last names, but with a different spelling. Their birthdays were also different. The department said at the time that it relies on schools to ensure they have the right child. “That night, she was terrified. She cried all night,” Harris said. “The school provided a counselor the next morning but we took her to more professional licensed personnel.” TRENDING STORIES: 8-year-old girl dies hours after she was hit by car crossing street for bus Siblings from metro Atlanta recount terror during Florida school shooting Man says his mother's grave, others damaged by cemetery workers Harris’ daughter, Kennedi, is now trying to turn what happened to her into something positive. With the help of her parents, Kennedi started the company K-Lock, making items including identification lockets that include the child’s name, emergency contact and school. “So I don’t get lost again and no one else will go through what I did,” she said. Harris said the company serves an even bigger purpose for his daughter. “To give her a coping mechanism to be able to deal with that traumatic experience and just see that her confidence is coming back,” he said. Kennedi has flourished with her new purpose, and even spoke at her school’s career day. Harris said state officials are still working to improve procedures to keep this from happening again.

Bulldog News

  • Georgia men’s basketball will play Tennessee on Saturday, February 17, 2018, in Athens. Find below the game time, TV channel and how to watch online. ATHENS ― Georgia basketball (14-11, 5-8 SEC) is fighting like mad just to get to .500 in SEC play and keep its flickering postseason hopes alive. Tennessee (19-6, 9-4) is striving to stay on top and forge a Top 4 finish in the league to set itself up for a postseason run. Both teams have only five regular-season games left in which to do it – two of them against each other. Something’s got to give. The first matchup is Saturday at UGA’s Stegeman Coliseum. And while that hasn’t exactly been a house of horrors for visiting opponents ― the Dogs are 9-3 at home ― the Volunteers are vulnerable away from Thompson-Boling Arena. They’re 6-3 in road games and lost to Alabama by 28 points the last time they ventured out of Knoxville. So, they can be had. Without a doubt, though, Georgia and coach Mark Fox need this one worse. An NCAA favorite when the season started, the Bulldogs haven’t played like an NCAA Tournament team since mid-January, dropping six of seven games. But that was before pulling off an overtime stunner over Florida on Wednesday night. The 72-69 victory was Georgia’s first in Gainesville since 2002. It was made possible only after the Bulldogs wiped out a 7-point deficit in the final 90 seconds and got a pair of 3-pointers from star forward Yante Maten in the last 15 seconds of regulation to force overtime. “Yante’s a winner,” Fox said after the game, in which Maten finished with 23 points and 10 rebounds. “Most people just see him play. They don’t know him as a young man. He’s a terrific person and he’s a great Georgia Bulldog and that was obviously a great shot at the end.” The Bulldogs’ victory moved them from up to 69 from 83 in RPI. Tennessee, meanwhile, is a solid 13. SEC Network broadcasters no doubt will focus on the front-court matchup of Maten – the SEC’s leading scorer and rebounder at 19.5 and 8.7 per game – against Tennessee forward Grant Williams, the Volunteers’ leading scorer and rebounder at 16.2 and 6.0. “I’m not sure there are two better power forwards anywhere right now,” Fox said. But for the Bulldogs, it’s all about what they get out of anybody else. Five Georgia players scored in double figures against the Gators, which was an anomaly. The Bulldogs have had little in the way of consistent offense outside of Maten, who remains their only player among the top 48 scorers in the SEC. Meanwhile, Georgia hasn’t gotten nearly enough help beyond the arc. The Vols have four of the SEC’s top 20 3-point shooters and have recorded 53 more 3-point baskets than the Bulldogs’ 149. Georgia brought sophomore Tyree Crump off the bench to relieve an injured Turtle Jackson and played him 26 minutes against the Gators. He responded with three 3s and scored 13 points to provide some perimeter scoring pop and added five assists. The Bulldogs will need similar production versus the Volunteers Saturday. Georgia-Tennessee basketball: Game info, details Time: Tip-off is at 6 p.m. ET Date: February 17, 2018 Location: Stegeman Coliseum, Athens. Records: Georgia 14-11 overall, 5-8 SEC; Tennessee 19-6 overall, 9-4 SEC. How can I watch the game? The game can be watched on SEC Network. How can I live stream the game? The game can be seen on the WatchESPN app. (Cable or satellite subscription required.) Projected Bulldogs starting lineup Guard: Sophomore Tyree Crump Guard: Senior Juwan Parker Forward: Freshman Nicolas Claxton Forward: Senior Yante Maten Forward: Freshman Rayshaun Hammonds What’s next for Georgia? Georgia plays South Carolina on Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. ET in Columbia, S.C. The post Georgia-Tennessee basketball: Time, TV, how to watch online (February 17, 2018) appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Georgia Bulldogs’ run to the College Football Playoff National Championship Game wouldn’t have been possible without the work of Kirby Smart’s staff. And now they’re going to be compensated because of it. Smart’s 10 on-field assistants will earn nearly $2 million more in 2018 than they did in 2017. In 2017, Smart’s assistants made $4.56 million. In 2018, they’ll make $6.42 million. Defensive Coordinator Mel Tucker has received a raise to $1.5 million, up from $900,000 last year. Georgia’s defense was one of the best in the country this past season. Assistant coach James Coley, who is expected to move from receivers coach to another position, has been bumped to $850,000 from $450,000 last year. Coley turned down a job offer from Texas A&M to become offensive coordinator. Offensive line coach Sam Pittman will now earn $825,000, after earning $660,000 last year.  Offensive coordinator Jim Chaney received a $100,000 raise and will now earn $950,000. Strength and conditioning coordinator Scott Sinclair also received a significant bump and will now earn $450,000. Sinclair earned $300,000 last year.  2018 staff: Mel Tucker - $1,500,000 Jim Chaney - $950,000 James Coley - $850,000 Sam Pittman - $825,000 Dell McGee - $550,000 Tray Scott - $420,000 Cortez Hankton - $375,000 Glenn Schumann - $325,000 Dan Lanning - $325,000 Scott Fountain - $300,000  2017 staff:  Mel Tucker - $900,000 Jim Chaney - $850,000 Sam Pittman - $660,000 James Coley - $450,000 Tray Scott - $400,000 Kevin Sherrer - $375,000 Dell McGee - $350,000 Shane Beamer - $300,000 Glenn Schumann - $275,000 Smart himself is expected to receive a substantial increase from his $3.75 million base salary, but that has not been announced yet.  New roles and titles on the staff could also be in order, but were not announced.  Georgia’s salary rule compares favorably with that of the staffs of two other powerhouse programs, who have also announced their assistant coach salaries for 2018.  Ohio State’s assistant coaches now make $7.06 million, with raises this offseason that totaled $3.4 million. So it nearly doubled, helped by the addition of the 10th assistant coach, Alex Grinch, who received $800,000 to leave Washington State for Ohio State.  Eight of Ohio State’s 10 assistants are earning at least $500,000.  The salary pool for Clemson’s assistant coaches is now $6.58 million, with raises this offseason of just under $1 million. Four of Clemson’s assistant coaches are earning at least $500,000. This article was written by Seth Emerson, DawgNation.
  • Athens, GA - There’s a popular term around Athens, Georgia these days that also stretches as far as the Georgia Bulldog footprint reaches: “Fire Mark Fox.” But could the job of the head coach of the oftentimes struggling UGA men’s basketball team be safer than we all think? Like, much safer? Let me explain.  I took the time to read an article from Pete Thamel of Yahoo Sports in which he cites his sources regarding what could happen once details emerge in the ongoing FBI investigations into seemingly countless NCAA basketball programs both major and not. The article is terrifying for many living around states like Kentucky, North Carolina, Alabama, Pennsylvania, etc., and not because programs in those states are specifically named, but rather language that speculates so many of the top schools in contention today are eventually going to be outed as some of the most corrupt in a sport that is widely considered one of the most corrupt in all of sports.  A fun line from one of Thamel’s sources in the article states - and I paraphrase - ‘If the findings are released before the NCAA Tournament, then Tennessee-Chattanooga could be a No. 2 seed come March.’ That’s a clever way of saying that nobody is safe, and apparently many at the top are indeed about to be in really, really hot water.  This is where the UGA basketball program and coach Mark Fox come into play, at least in my mind. If anybody cares to make a wager with me, I would be more than willing to agree to do something extremely embarrassing or degrading if it ever comes to light that the UGA basketball program is in trouble with the FBI or the NCAA. I have been around the program long enough and know the hierarchy of UGA Athletics well enough to feel extremely confident that UGA fans can sleep easy the night before these FBI findings are released - which could be any day, it could be as long as a year from now. We just don’t know.  UGA has struggled lately, yes. I’ve watched spurts of basketball taking place in Stegeman Coliseum and on other courts around the SEC that I am not convinced could score more points than Clarke Central High School. But I’ve also seen spurts that look like the NCAA Tournament contender we all expected going into this season put together good wins (yes, plural) against Florida, Marquette, Alabama, St. Mary’s, and Georgia Tech. But the on-court performances have little to nothing to do with my new theory on the status of Mark Fox in Athens.  I believe every program in the NCAA should be playing “wait and see.” I know Ole Miss just fired its head coach Andy Kennedy after bringing the Rebels (no, Black Bears, wait - I think it’s still Rebels) close to the NCAA Tournament many times over a decade, invited in twice and another six times into the NIT, but never able to take the program over the hurdle to being a national contender. Does that sound familiar? Dawg fans? I thought so. But what if - hear me out - Ole Miss already knows something we don’t know about the FBI investigations. You don’t have to look too far into former football coaches phone records and other major allegations to remember that Ole Miss isn't writing any books on morality and how to do things the right way these days.  What if Georgia pulled the trigger and fired Mark Fox after a disappointing finish to this season, then went and hired some up-and-coming young coach or even a veteran many will hope brings a culture of winning with them to Athens? Is it honestly worth the risk locking a coach into a new contract that may soon have their name plastered in the headlines with “FBI Investigation Reveals...” next to it? Again, you’d like to think the vetting of a new coach would be thorough, but the ominous tone of sources who know how dark the cloud over NCAA Basketball is about to be leads one to wonder if any move is worth the risk. Flat out and simply put - nobody. knows. how. bad. this. could. get.   Thamel’s article also cites sources who thoroughly believe the landscape of college basketball, its recruiting, and as stated “lottery pick players’” eligibility could be rocked and realigned. It leaves one to wonder just how impactful it could be for a program like Georgia, that consistently sits on the proverbial “bubble” of being good, but is flat out being beaten by better teams. Oh, and recruiting is already good right now in Athens. Very good. With commitments from a pair of the state of Georgia’s best in the 2018 class, and what many are saying will be one of Mark Fox’s best recruits ever in a 2019 commitment from 5-star point guard Ashton Hagans out of Covington, Ga, there’s legitimate hope in the talent department.  And many will quickly point out that talent hasn’t always been a problem for Fox, but do you need a refresher on players from the state of Georgia that have been lured to major programs out of state with what may actually have been lures too good to pass up - you know what I’m sayin’? Sure, that’s all speculation at this point but the tea leaves are currently reading that something just ain’t right. If my inner-Nostradmous proves to be true and Georgia is safe when the FBI findings are eventually released, then Georgia could instantaneously become a safe school in the eyes of a lot of talent looking to play college hoops. Especially in the talent-rich back yard between Cloudland Canyon and Jekyll Island and Bainbridge and Hartwell. So while the UGA basketball team  will likely look bad a few more times this season, and in all likelihood have a short trip to St. Louis next month for the SEC Basketball Tournament, think about the big picture of college basketball as your little fingers tweet the popular phrase these days calling for Fox’s job. Because I wouldn’t be surprised if it’s a situation being monitored on many levels, not just in terms of wins and loses. But more like the FBI. Let it all soak in, why don’t ya.  **Shameless plug time!: Check out my new podcast “The Second String Podcast” which I do with our sister station 106.1 Your Georgia Country’s Morning Show host Walker. We are just two guys who wish we were famous sports radio personalities talking sports. You can listen by clicking the link to the Podcast on this website’s On Demand tab. Thanks!
  • Welcome to the Question of the Day, where our writers answer (or try to answer) the best questions submitted by Georgia fans. If you’d like to submit a question, please e-mail us at  ugaquestionoftheday@gmail.com. Or you can tweet us at  here and  here. Look for the Question of the Day every Monday through Friday. Do you think James Cook and Zamir White can continue the standard set by Chubb and Michel? ― William Cerros Homer, Ga. Mr. Cerros, I love this question, because it gives me a chance to talk about one of my favorite football subjects: tailbacks. And Georgia tailbacks in particular. I don’t even know if you can really call them tailbacks anymore. Technically, Georgia is rarely in an I-formation anymore. Most of the time, the Bulldogs’ backs line up alongside or behind a quarterback in the shotgun formation or in a split backfield with another running back or perhaps a fullback. Fullbacks, by the way, are kind of going the way of the typewriter. I don’t believe Georgia even has one on scholarship anymore. For the record, Todd Gurley, Nick Chubb and Sony Michel and all those other backs the Bulldogs have had refer to Georgia as “Running Back U.” So I guess that’s what we should probably go with. And as everyone knows, the Bulldogs have several running backs on scholarship at the moment. Five, in fact. That’s the same number they had last year before Chubb and Michel graduated. As you mentioned, they were replaced by incoming freshmen James Cook and Zamir “Zeus” White, who already are enrolled. To answer your question succinctly, yes, I believe Cook and White can continue the standard set by Chubb and Michel. But first they’ll have to get past those other three backs ― D’Andre Swift, Brian Herrien and Elijah Holyfield ― and that will be no easy task. Swift is a sophomore and Herrien and Holyfield are juniors, and all three have played extensively ― not to mention trained and studied extensively ― before Cook and White ever showed up. When spring practice begins next month, the new guys will be lining up behind those three veterans, plus a couple of veteran walk-ons) for every drill. That said, as coach Kirby Smart ― and really any Power 5 coach worth his weight in salt ― has demonstrated, the Bulldogs are going to play the most productive players, no matter what year they are or what level of experience they have. And in Cook and White, Georgia has landed another pair of extremely high-pedigree backs. In fact, not only did the Bulldogs get the nation’s consensus No. 1-rated running back in White, of Laurinburg, N.C., but they signed Cook, rated No. 3 in the country at the position. So it’s actually very similar to 2014, when both Chubb and Michel came to Georgia as 5-star prospects. They, of course, left as the Bulldogs’ No. 2 and 5 rushers of all time with more than 8,000 yards and 80 touchdowns between them. That’s a tough act to follow. There are some who believe that Swift, who came from Philadelphia, might be even better than both of them. It remains to be seen if he can run between the tackles the way Chubb and even Michel did, but he might be even shiftier and, ahem, swifter in the open field. The durability questions can never be answered until a player is in a situation in which he’s asked to go onto the field and absorb that physical punishment week after week. Chubb and Michel both drew high marks in that regard, and they both dealt with injuries. As for these two freshmen specifically, White is recovering from a knee injury. That’s the bad news. The good news was he traveled to Athens in December to have surgery on his right ACL performed by UGA doctors, and as an early enrollee, his rehabilitation is being supervised by Ron Courson, the Bulldogs’ sports medicine director of international renown. That can only help toward getting White back on the field, which he should have an opportunity to do during the season, if not the preseason. With knee procedures being what they are now, White eventually should be able to return to his previous form, which some in the program have said should be along the lines of Gurley when it comes to size, strength, speed and power. He’s every bit of the 6-foot, 210 pounds that he was listed, and then some, and can run the 100 meters in 10.85 seconds. Cook is a little less ballyhooed, but he also played in a tougher high school division at Miami Central of Florida’s Class AAAAAA. The brother of former Florida State star and Minnesota Vikings’ back Dalvin Cook, he is smaller (5-11, 183) and shiftier and should make a nice complement to White if they develop into the primary running back tandem. That might not be just yet. They might have to bide their time. But if either one beats out any of these other backs as a freshman, then Running Back U is going to be in for another great chapter. Have a question for Georgia beat writers Seth Emerson and Chip Towers? Email us at ugaquestionoftheday@gmail.com. The post Can freshmen James Cook, Zamir White meet standard set by UGA running backs? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • A representative with the Memorial Park Funeral Home in Macon says that the funeral arrangements for former University of Georgia multi-sport athlete and Clarke Central football coach Billy Henderson have been set. Mabel White Baptist Church will host the funeral on Saturday, Feb. 17 at 11 a.m. with the family receiving guests after the service. Burial will take place the same day at Macon Memorial Park Cemetery at 2 p.m. In addition, there will be a celebration of life in Athens on Sunday, Feb. 25 at the Classic Center at 2 p.m. Henderson passed away on Wednesday at the age of 89.  The information below is from UGA Sports Communications:  Henderson, a two-sport standout for the Bulldogs in the late 1940s, earned a total of eight letters. He played on the 1946 and 1948 SEC Championship football teams and was a three-time MVP in baseball. Following graduation, he was drafted and signed by the Chicago Cubs. He spent two years in their organization before deciding on a teaching and coaching career.  His illustrious coaching career included stints at Jefferson High School (1951-53), Athens High (1953-55), Furman University (1956), University of South Carolina (1956-57), Willingham High (1958-70) and Mount DeSales High (1970-73) in Macon before returning to Athens and Clarke Central High School in 1973. He became an icon for the Gladiators, compiling a record of 222-65 and three state championships over 23 seasons. His overall head coaching record was 285-107-16.  Over the years, the success of his teams were not limited to football, owning three state championships in baseball, one in swimming and numerous region titles in all three sports. Also, well over 125 of his players earned college scholarships. He was named the recipient of the 1995 Bill Hartman Award —the highest honor a former UGA student-athlete can attain. Named for Georgia’s long-time kicking coach and chairman of the Georgia Student Educational Fund, the award recognizes former Bulldog student-athletes who have distinguished themselves as alumni. At the time, Henderson was the sixth recipient, joining former NFL quarterback and Atlanta businessman Fran Tarkenton, Atlanta Olympic Committee CEO Billy Payne, former Gov. Carl Sanders, Atlanta developer Tom Cousins and the Bulldogs' legendary assistant athletic director Dan Magill. For his lifetime of contributions to young people, Henderson was honored in March of 1993 by more than 800 people who came together at Clarke Central in “A Tribute to Billy” and in celebration of Billy Henderson Day in Athens. Then Gov. Zell Miller, Sen. Paul Broun and Rep. Louise McBee were among those who sent congratulatory letters and resolutions honoring him. He also founded the Athens Hall of Fame and conducted youth football camps at the YMCA and he holds the record for most stolen bases in the UGA baseball progarm with 91.