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  • The Georgia Bulldog football team begins spring practice today: workouts culminate with the April 20 G-Day game in Sanford Stadium. The Dogs begin the 2019 season in 165 days, August 31 in Nashville against the Vanderbilt Commodores.  From Mike Griffith, AJC DawgNation.. Georgia coach Kirby Smart has emphasized several times in several ways that championship football requires all units working together. Indeed, much of the Bulldogs’ offensive and defensive scheming is predicated on Smart and his staff analyzing strengths and weaknesses and arriving at core alignments and plays. The sooner Georgia knows itself, the better, and that makes the Bulldogs’ 15 spring practice dates pivotal. Here’s a way-too-early positional group ranking, an order that could be affected by an updated injury report or the emergence of a newcomer. 1. Offensive line The lock: Junior left tackle Andrew Thomas, Outland Trophy candidate. The question: Sophomore Cade Mays, where does he fit in? 2. Defensive backs The lock: Senior safety J.R. Reed, team leader of defense. The question: Sophomore Tyson Campbell, will skills match elite speed and ideal length? 3. Specialists The lock: Senior kicker Rodrigo Blankenship. The question: Can Georgia adequately replace Mecole Hardman in return game? 4. Quarterbacks The lock: Junior Jake Fromm, third-year starter, offense on his shoulders. The question: How much of the offense can freshman Dwan Mathis pick up? 5. Linebackers The lock: None. The question: Can senior Tae Crowder become the playmaker Georgia lacked last year? 6. Running backs The lock: Junior tailback D’Andre Swift, Hesiman Trophy candidate The question (s): Will production match 5-star ratings of James Cook and Zamir White in 2019? 7. Receivers/tight ends The lock: Junior receiver J.J. Holloman is the go-to target. The question: Can graduate transfer tight end Eli Wolf fill the void left by Isaac Nauta? 8. Defensive linemen The lock: None.
  • Today is election day in Jackson, Barrow, Elbert, and Hart counties, where voters go to the polls to settle school bond and sales tax referendums. Gwinnett County voters will decide tomorrow a controversial proposal to expand MARTA into Gwinnett. The polls that open at 7 o’clock this morning are open until 7 tonight.  There will be no election today in Bowman: Pete Gibbons, who left the mayor’s office three years ago to make an unsuccessful run for the state Senate, has been sworn in and is now serving as the replacement for Mark Berryman, who resigned as Mayor of Bowman back in December. Gibbons was the only candidate to qualify in the special election that was to have been held today. A judge cancelled the voting.
  • Fifth-ranked Georgia returns to Foley Field this week starting with a Tuesday tilt with Georgia State. First pitch will be at 5:02 p.m. and be available online (SEC Network+) and broadcast via the Georgia Bulldog Sports Network.   Georgia (18-2) is riding a nine-game winning streak and is off to its best start since 2009 (19-2). Tuesday’s game will feature the same pitching matchup as last week with Georgia junior RHP Tim Elliott (2-1, 0.50 ERA) going against Panthers junior Tyler Koch (0-2, 10.95 ERA). Elliott picked up the win, going six innings and allowing just one unearned run on one hit with two strikeouts. Offensively for the Bulldogs in the victory, LJ Talley had a home run and 3 RBI, Patrick Sullivan collected three hits and an RBI while Aaron Schunk had a pair of hits, an RBI and a save.   Georgia went 4-0 last week including sweeping its first-ever three-game SEC series in Columbia over No. 22 South Carolina. It marked the sixth straight series win over the Gamecocks and the second consecutive sweep. It was the first time that USC had been swept in Columbia since 2013. Meanwhile, the Panthers went 2-1 against Appalachian State in Sun Belt action. Georgia redshirt freshman 1B/OF Chaney Rogers (.250-0-1) has an older brother, Jake, who is a senior pitcher on the Georgia State squad. Jake is in the weekend rotation and is 1-3 with a 6.43 ERA. Chaney has appeared in 14 games with six starts for the Bulldogs.   In 2019, Georgia has relied on outstanding pitching and defense plus timely hitting. Georgia’s pitching staff has a 2.59 ERA, and the starters have been exceptional. Bulldog starters have combined to go 14-1 with a 2.10 ERA, and the only loss came 1-0 on an unearned run versus LIU Brooklyn on Feb. 26. Elliott was the tough luck losing pitcher that day.   After the first week of SEC action, Georgia is one of four undefeated squads and leads the Eastern Division by two games. Georgia is batting .300 (3rd in SEC) with a .421 on base percentage (2nd in SEC), a 2.59 ERA (6th in SEC) and a .978 fielding percentage (4th in SEC). Before this past weekend, Georgia’s last SEC road sweep of a top 25 team came in 2004 against No. 16 Florida. Georgia’s last 3-0 start in league play came in 2007 when it swept Auburn in Athens.   Georgia junior returning All-American Aaron Schunk, who is one of the nation’s top two-way talents, is the NCAA and SEC co-leader with seven saves while batting .321-4-18 in 20 starts at third base. He is one of six players nationally to have seven saves, the other SEC player is Nolan Crisp (Florida). Senior All-SEC 2B LJ Talley (.403-4-15) is enjoying his finest campaign, leading the Bulldogs in just about every offensive category including a .625 slugging percentage and .a 506 on base percentage with just one error in 73 total chances. His. 403 batting average ranks 3rd in the SEC. Redshirt sophomore RF Riley King (.364-3-22) ranks second on the team in batting and RBI. Junior SS Cam Shepherd (.267-1-11) leads the SEC with 22 walks. Junior OF Tucker Maxwell leads the team with five home runs, 25 RBI and nine stolen bases while batting .333.   In the national polls, Georgia moved up three spots to No. 5 in the D1Baseball.com top 25. Also, the Bulldogs are ranked No. 8 by USA Today/Coaches, No. 9 by Collegiate Baseball and No. 11 by Baseball America.   On Friday at 7 p.m., Georgia resumes SEC play with No. 11 LSU (15-5, 3-0 SEC) at Foley Field. Please note Saturday’s game is already sold out. For the Saturday, March 23rd game, Georgia will hold its inaugural Foley Fest. From 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m, fans in the parking lot next to Foley Field will be treated to live music featuring Todd Cowart and the Blank Canvas, interactive games and activities plus there will be food tents.   Television/Radio TV: SEC Network+: (Matt Stewart & Jason Jacobs)  Tues. Streaming Link: 1st pitch at 5:02 p.m.: http://www.gado.gs/1y9 Radio: Georgia Bulldog Sports Network from IMG College (David Johnston & Jeff Dantzler) Stations: 960 AM-WRFC and selected affiliates (check your local listings), also via the Georgia Bulldogs app and TuneIn app.   Additional Coverage on Twitter: @BaseballUGA   Tickets -Foley Field – Gates/Ticket Booth open 2 hours before first pitch. -Reserved Seat Tickets: $8; General Admission Tickets: $5 -Order online or by calling 1-877-542-1231 -UGA Student Tickets: Free Admission with valid UGA Student ID Card -UGA Student Gate is located off Rutherford Street
  • There were many things Alice Huffard Richards was known for—her tenacity, her love of children, her knowledge of Latin plant names, among them. And her pruning shears, which were an old pair of scissors, always within reach. “She’d go to visit a friend, and pause to prune the flowers before she went in. She’d even pull over on the side of the road and prune or deadhead flowers that needed some love—and she would do this anywhere and everywhere,” said Jim Richards, one of Alice Richards’ seven children, who spoke during the Monday morning dedication ceremony. “She was renowned for always having scissors in the car with her.” The Alice H. Richards Children’s Garden at the State Botanical Garden of Georgia memorializes her commitment to plants, children and Georgia. The garden is set to open March 23 with a festival-style spring celebration featuring food trucks, music, dance and aerial performances at the Theater-in-the-Woods stage and free fun throughout the entire day. The first $1 million toward the garden was given to UGA by Alice Richards’ family. The balance, about $4 million, was raised through private donations, including money from all 80 members of the State Botanical Garden advisory board, of which Richards was a charter member, and every employee of the garden. The centerpiece of the State Botanical Garden, a UGA public service and outreach unit, the children’s garden is a 2.5-acre interactive outdoor classroom where visitors can learn about Georgia history and natural resources, native plants and pollinators, and healthy foods. “In nearly every speech I give, I always try to remind people that we are a land-grant and sea-grant university, and with that comes a responsibility to make our resources available to individuals and communities throughout the state,” University of Georgia President Jere W. Morehead told the more than 200 people who attended the dedication and ribbon-cutting. “This botanical garden, and especially the children’s garden that we’re dedicating today, is such a great example of that goal.” The garden features a replica of Ellison’s Cave in Walker County, the 12th deepest cave in the United States, mastodon fossils from 40 million years ago, granite mined from Elbert County and a pitcher plant bog—just a few points of interest visitors can expect to see, touch and explore at the new children’s garden. “The garden is designed to showcase Georgia and the valuable natural resources in our state,” said Jennifer Cruse-Sanders, director of the State Botanical Garden. “We are so excited to share these themes with communities in Georgia and beyond, as a way of achieving our mission for service and outreach.” Hailing from Carroll County, Georgia, Alice Richards dreamed of creating a children’s garden in Athens, from the time she joined the State Botanical Garden in the early 1980s, when the board of advisors was formed. “She asked me why she should join the garden’s board, and I said, ‘you love flora and fauna, but more than that, you love conserving land and leaving things better,’” said Susan Duncan, who recruited Richards to join the original board of advisors. “You have the opportunity to create something wonderful.” Richards was as comfortable recruiting new board members to the garden board as she was on her hands and knees, planting, trimming and watering in the flower garden. When the master plans for the State Botanical Garden were being drawn up, she proposed the initial concept for a children’s garden—a place to nurture and enrich the lives of the next generation. “I have heard from people who knew Alice that she loved children, and that she was a nurturing and caring person,” Cruse-Sanders says. “It is fitting that the new garden that we have created to engage and bring wonder to children and families is filled with that same spirit.” “She would be amazed and delighted if she could see it now,” Jim Richards said.
  • Athens-Clarke County Commissioners meet tonight: the 6 o’clock session at City Hall will include action on the local noise ordinance and proposed restrictions to on-street parking on Prince Avenue in Athens. Commissioners will also talk about local compliance to the Americans with Disabilities Act.  A public meeting on plans for a Highway 441 bypass around Bishop is set for 5 o’clock this afternoon at Oconee Veterans Park: officials from the  Georgia DOT will be on hand.  This afternoon’s Gainesville City Council meeting is underway at 5:30 at the Public Safety Complex in Gainesville. The Council is looking at plans that could impact the future of the Lake Lanier Olympic Rowing Venue. The city of Gainesville is looking to control of the park property, which is now in the hands of Hall County.

Bulldog News

  • ATHENS — Georgia coach Kirby Smart has emphasized several times in several ways that championship football requires all units working together. Indeed, much of the Bulldogs’ offensive and defensive scheming is predicated on Smart and his staff analyzing strengths and weaknesses and game arriving at core alignments and plays. The sooner Georgia knows itself, the better, and that makes the Bulldogs’ 15 spring practice dates pivotal. Here’s a way-too-early positional group ranking, an order that could be affected by an updated injury report or the emergence of a newcomer. 1. Offensive line The lock: Junior left tackle Andrew Thomas, Outland Trophy candidate. The question: Sophomore Cade Mays, where does he fit in? 2. Defensive backs The lock: Senior safety J.R. Reed, team leader of defense. The question: Sophomore Tyson Campbell, will skills match elite speed and ideal length? 3. Specialists The lock: Senior kicker Rodrigo Blankenship. The question: Can Georgia adequately replace Mecole Hardman? 3. Quarterbacks The lock: Junior Jake Fromm, third-year starter, offense on his shoulders. The question: How much of the offense can freshman Dwan Mathis pick up? 4. Linebackers The lock: None. The question: Can senior Tae Crowder become the playmaker Georgia lacked last year? 5. Running backs The lock: Junior tailback D’Andre Swift, Hesiman Trophy candidate The question (s): Will production match 5-star ratings of James Cook and Zamir White in 2019? 6. Receivers/tight ends The lock: Junior receiver J.J. Holloman is the go-to target. The question: Can graduate transfer tight end Eli Wolf fill the void left by Isaac Nauta? 7. Defensive linemen The lock: None. The question: Will sophomore Jordan Davis become an SEC dominator? More Georgia football spring 2019 Georgia linebackers: most improved unit? UGA running backs 4 spring football questions 5 questions for UGA spring football, it’s Jake Fromm’s team Does Georgia have championship level Defensive line? Questions 4 questions for Georgia football O-Line 3 pre-spring football questions on Georgia QB situation Kirby Smart provides preview on young receivers  Georgia secondary still best in the SEC? The post Georgia football: Way-too-early team spring position group rankings appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Best I can tell, it has been my task to cover college football spring practices for about 26 of the 31 years that encompass my sportswriting career. There were a few years that I wasn’t covering college football. There were a few more that I bounced around and saw a little bit of a lot of different teams. Most of time, though, I’ve been charged with covering all of Georgia’s spring practices. There have been times those practice sessions have been pretty interesting, some times that they’ve been incredibly dull and all over the place between. I’m anticipating the Bulldogs’ spring practice this year to be fairly intriguing. There are a lot of reasons for that, but the main one is the influx of new players. Early enrollment was a fairly new concept in the 1990s and still a bit of a rarity then. Quarterback Eric Zeier was one of the first high-profile recruits to do it and it served him very well that first year. Zeier served notice at the 1991 G-Day Game that he was going to be a factor that season, and boy was he ever. Since then, early enrollment has become a regular part of the recruiting process. Nowadays, everybody everywhere has at least a hand full of signees that come in early and get embedded with their respective teams since the first week of January. But it remains somewhat rare to see as many new players come in early — 14 — as Georgia has this year. Fourteen is a lot. The most ever for the Bulldogs. They had 13 in that 2013 class that included 30 total signees (and experienced some of the worst attrition ever for Georgia football). It’s not the most in college football. Alabama had 16 enroll early out of its 23-man recruiting class this year. But 14 is a bunch of new Bulldogs, no matter how one slices it up. That in and of itself cranks up the competition factor. Georgia has several areas in which it’d love to get some impact from from some of these early arrivals. Quarterback, linebacker and defensive back immediately spring to mind. I’d say receiver, too. But, oddly enough, the Bulldogs weren’t able to bring in any of their wideout signees early Dominick Blaylock happens to attend a school in Walton High that doesn’t allow it. Georgia has experienced the same thing with players it has signed out of Pace Academy, including Jamaree Salyer, Andrew Thomas and Trey Blount. But that’s where spring ball has changed a good bit over the years. It’s much more competitive over the course of 15 practices than it used to be. Those sessions can go a long way to determining who is going to be starter in the fall. Not always, but often. The ideal situation is getting as many positions locked down and decided in the spring, so those guys can work together as a unit as much as possible on a volunteer basis over the summer. That way they hit the ground running in preseason practice. No doubt you’ve read numerous accounts of what various people believe the be the most pressing priorities of the spring for the Bulldogs. As for me, the order of importance goes this way: Determine a receiver rotation; Identify a backup quarterback; Establish a starting center; Settle on a right cornerback; Figure out who else will help on defense. Going with the receivers first is an easy call for me. It has been well-documented that the Bulldogs lost 106 catches and 20 touchdowns from last year’s wideouts, the majority of those being compiled by juniors Riley Ridley and Mecole Hardman. But that number actually goes up by 35 catches and 3 touchdowns when tight end Isaac Nauta and running back Elijah Holyfield are included. So the emphasis on throwing and catching the ball in spring practice is going to be heavy. It’s usually that way anyway this time of year, because it is rare for teams to pound on each other a lot this far away from the actual season. That said, Georgia will need to mindful of Jake Fromm’s arm health and be careful not to overthrow him. To that end, the Bulldogs would like to come out with a good idea who is going to be Fromm’s primary backup. I wrote extensively on Sunday about redshirt sophomore Stetson Bennett coming back via junior college and giving Georgia an immediate competent presence with regard to already knowing the offensive system. But freshman Dwan Mathis remains an intriguing figure, and one can he sure that the Bulldogs will work hard and fast to determine exactly what they have in this 6-foot-6 athlete who has run a 10.8 100 meters. Trey Hill leads the way to succeed Lamont Gaillard at center, but that’s not a given. As always, Sam Pittman probably suffer brain cramps from exploring all possibilities for determining the combination that results in the best five across the board. The competition to succeed Deandre Baker at right cornerback certainly will be intriguing. But starting with elevating Tyson Campbell there as Georgia did in the bowl game is the first in what are all positive alternatives at all the secondary positions. If early enrollees such as JUCO transfer D.J. Daniel or Tyrique Stevenson end up winning out, all the better. Same with outside linebackers. The recruiting at this position has been other-worldly. Between the 5-stars that are coming back and the ones coming in, something is going to have Conversely, that’s why I don’t list inside linebackers here. Certainly the Bulldogs want higher-level play than it got from the returnees last season. But I believe all the existing alternatives to be better than adequate and not necessarily paramount to Georgia’s cause.  And as exciting a prospect as is Nakobe Dean, ranked the No. 1 inside linebacker in America, I always think back to Roquan Smith’s struggles as a true freshman and how it was late in his sophomore season before he emerged as the star he actually was. Same on the D-line, same on the O-line, same in the offensive backfield, same on special teams. The rest of it is very much organic. That is, it’ll come together naturally through the teaching of concepts and fundamentals. The Bulldogs seek competition and improvement, but they’ll be able to go to war with they’ve got. What you’re NOT going to see is running back D’Andre Swift get much in the way of contact. I highly doubt you’ll see Zamir White get any at all. White, the heralded 2018 signee known as Zeus, is less than seven months removed from a second knee surgery that came eight months after the first. The Bulldogs will be very interested in seeing what the former No. 1 back in America can do, but that can wait until late summer, when he will have had a year to rehab and recover. Maybe the most important factor will be the Bulldogs getting used to some new voices and concepts from the coaching staff. For the first time since Kirby Smart has been head coach, somebody other than Jim Chaney or Mel Tucker will be putting together the practice script for the offense and defense, respectively. That said, I suspect it won’t change significantly from what Georgia has been doing the last four years. That’s why James Coley, Dan Lanning and Glenn Schumann were appointed coordinators. They’re going to give Smart what he wants, which is more of the same. But it’s that — the newness factor — that’s going to make this spring so fun and interesting. And then, of course, they’ll tear up all the depth charts and start from scratch in August. The post Newness factor is what makes Kirby Smart’s 4th spring practice his most interesting at Georgia appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia football might have had the best secondary in the nation last season, led by Thorpe Award winner Deandre Baker. The Bulldogs might once again have the best secondary in the nation in 2019, even with Baker moving on to the NFL. A mix of elite talent and coaching returns to Georgia, with Kirby Smart and new secondary coach Charlton Warren working with a deep and experienced group. WATCH: Georgia has hired ‘Mr. Intensity’ for secondary job The Bulldogs gave up only 28 plays of 25 yards or longer (compared to UGA’s offense making 66), and a big reason why was the defensive backs. Baker’s coverage had a lot to do with Georgia’s stubborn defense, but there are plenty of great players coming back.   Deandre Baker only gave up a lowly 0.46 yards per coverage snap this season, leading draft eligible SEC cornerbacks. pic.twitter.com/EbXf0paPuz — PFF Draft (@PFF_College) March 18, 2019   J.R Reed’s decision to return for a senior season has been surprisingly underplayed to this point, as Reed’s leadership and control of the defense from his safety position are invaluable. If there’s one sure thing on the Georgia defense, it’s J.R. Reed. The secondary, while arguably the best unit on defense, still has other questions to answer: Tyson Campbell time? Campbell, reputed to be one of the fastest players on the team, aims for big improvement and is the favorite to start opposite Eric Stokes. WATCH: Tyson Campbell shares lessons learned Smart threw the 5-star true freshman into the fire from the onset last season, perhaps prematurely, as Campbell got his share of burns. A shoulder subluxation injury at Missouri led to Campbell getting nauseated and leaving that game, allowing for Stokes to step up. RELATED: Shoulder subluxation won’t stop Tyson Campbell Richard LeCounte lll tackling It might be more appropriate to title it “Richard LeCounte weightlifting,” as this gifted safety’s biggest problem was how his light frame was often pushed around by bigger players. LeCounte, listed at 5-foot-11, 185 pounds, led the team with 74 tackles last season and he was active with two forced fumbles, two fumble recoveries, an interception and three pass break-ups. But LeCounte missed on many other tackles or got knocked back for extra yardage, something that won’t be as likely as he grows older and stronger. It’s not a stretch to say LeCounte has All-SEC talent who could evolve into an NFL safety provided his tackling improves. Star search More specifically, who and what will Smart decide to do with this secondary hybrid position? The proliferation of spread offenses has led to more and more snaps with a fifth defensive back on the field, often nicknamed “star” because of the need to play in space. Redshirt freshman Divaad Wilson is back from the ACL injury he suffered last spring and figures into the mix here, along with trusted senior Tyrique McGhee and junior Mark Webb. Newcomers D.J. Daniel and Tyrique Stevenson should not be counted out, as they have the size and talent to compete for a spot on the field when Georgia goes “11 best.” Daniel was the No. 2-ranked junior college cornerback, and early enrollee Stevenson is another highly-touted South Florida (Homestead) recruit. More Georgia football spring 2019 Georgia linebackers: most improved unit? UGA running backs 4 spring football questions 5 questions for UGA spring football, it’s Jake Fromm’s team Does Georgia have championship level Defensive line? Questions 4 questions for Georgia football O-Line 3 pre-spring football questions on Georgia QB situation Kirby Smart provides preview on young receivers    The post 3 spring football questions for Georgia defensive backs: Still second to none? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Amazingly, Georgia has had just two first-team All-SEC defensive players as selected by the league coaches in the last five years combined. The Bulldogs appear to have the talent and depth to replace 2018 selection, cornerback Deandre Baker. But no one on the roster has looked close to stepping into the shoes of 2017 Butkus Award winner Roquan Smith. None of last year’s Georgia linebackers, in fact, started all of the games for head coach and noted defensive guru Kirby Smart. UGA went linebacker by committee last season, unable to find an alpha dog outside of outside linebacker D’Andre Walker, the only player of note in the group. Outside linebackers coach Dan Lanning and Inside linebackers coach Glenn Schumann received promotions to coordinator and co-defensive coordinator and $700,000 in raises, so Smart must feel they are doing great development work. RELATED: Dan Lanning a thrifty, promising hire at defensive coordinator Georgia’s linebackers were anything but impressive the last time they took the field, however, getting outplayed by Texas in a 28-21 Sugar Bowl loss. Here are three questions about the Georgia linebacking corps for spring drills Is Monty Rice the answer? Rice was a game captain and popular Smart pick for media interviews, sent out as a team representative often, a sign of the head coach’s confidence in him. That said, not everyone was so convinced Rice would be the answer to replace Smith, even after his 14-tackle performance in the 2018 G-Day game. “Monty Rice can’t hold Roquan Smith’s jock,” one former Georgia assistant coach told an AJC-DawgNation reporter last summer. To be fair, it could be a while before UGA produces another SEC Defensive Player of the Year like Smith. Rice was third on the UGA defense last season with 59 tackles, despite playing in just 10 games. Rice, however, had just one sack and one forced fumble, and no interceptions. 5-star help? Georgia has 5-star talent at the linebacker position, both inside and outside. WATCH: Rising UGA linebackers ‘This is just the beginning’ The Bulldogs have an impressive list of players in the linebacking corps who received a 5-star rating from at least one ratings service. • Robert Beal 6-4, 244 • Brenton Cox 6-4, 245 • Adam Anderson 6-5, 225 • Nakobe Dean 6-0, 220 • Nolan Smith, 6-3, 227 Will a 2019 starter or perhaps even first-team All-SEC selection emerge from that group in spring drills? Who’s No. 1? Georgia signed the No. 1 junior college player in the nation in Jermaine Johnson, a 6-6, 250-pounder originally from Eden Prairie, Minn. who comes to Athens by way of Independence Community College in Kansas. Johnson, who chose UGA over Oklahoma, Texas and Oregon, among others, has opened eyes in the weight room and offseason workouts. Weight room workouts and high recruiting rankings don’t always translate to success, particularly in the ultra-competitive SEC. It wasn’t so long ago that Tennessee signed a No. 1-ranked junior college player named Jonathan Kongbo, a 6-5, 264-pound supposed can’t-miss star. Suffice it to say, Kongbo — who also held offers for Alabama, Florida State and Ohio State — missed. Spring will be telling for Johnson, along with several other Georgia linebackers who look to make their position group the most improved on the team in 2019. More Georgia football spring 2019 UGA running backs 4 spring football questions 5 questions for UGA spring football, it’s Jake Fromm’s team Does Georgia have championship level Defensive line? Questions 4 questions for Georgia football O-Line 3 pre-spring football questions on Georgia QB situation Kirby Smart provides preview on young receivers  G-Day named one of most intriguing spring games ESPN snubs UGA freshmen in spring preview The post 3 Georgia spring football questions for linebacking corps: Most improved unit? appeared first on DawgNation.